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Book Review: 'The Help' by Kathryn Stockett

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❶She is surrounded by some nice revelations as well. But, this is only the backdrop of the story.

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At the end of the novel, what final words does Aibileen want Mae Mobley to remember?

Skeeter does not believe that Constantine would leave her like this; she knows something is wrong and believes that information will eventually come out. Everyone Skeeter asks about the unexpected disappearance of Constantine pretends it never happened and avoids giving her any real answers. She decides with the assistance of a publisher that she wants to reveal the truth about being a colored maid in Mississippi.

Skeeter struggles to communicate with the maids and gain their trust. The dangers of writing a book about African Americans speaking out in the South during the early s hover constantly over the three women.

Elaine Stein had also suggested to Skeeter that she find a subject to write about which she can be dedicated to and passionate about. Skeeter realizes that she wants to expose to the world in the form of a book the deplorable conditions the maids in the South endure in order to barely survive.

Aibileen finally agrees to tell her story. Minny, despite her distrust of whites, eventually agrees as well, but she and Aibileen are unable to convince others to tell their stories. Skeeter researches several laws governing what blacks still can and cannot do in Mississippi, and her growing opposition to the racial order results in her being shunned by her social circle.

The other maids decide that they are willing to take a chance with their jobs, and their safety, and join the book project. Not all the stories are negative, and some describe beautiful and generous, loving and kind events; while others are cruel and even brutal. A film adaptation of The Help was released on August 10, The film also received three other Academy Award nominations: From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia.

This article is about the novel. That is not what I got. But the pages turned, and when I next looked up at the clock, a few hours had passed and I was well on my way to the halfway point.

There are countless trite episodes in The Help , standard plot fillers that can be found in both heaving Harlequin romances and sucky Oprah Book Club fodder. But there are more moments of striking beauty, humanity, and humor, even if the ending is a bit of a cop-out. Is The Help Great Literature? Is it a fast and enjoyable read? So congratulations, Whitey McWhiterson, I wound up not hating your book.

And God knows I tried. View all 39 comments. Jun 17, Annalisa rated it it was amazing Recommended to Annalisa by: Here is an illustrative tale of what it was like to be a black maid during the civil rights movement of the s in racially conflicted Mississippi. Stockett includes this quote by Howell Raines in her personal except at the end of the novel: There is no trickier subject for a writer from the South than that o Here is an illustrative tale of what it was like to be a black maid during the civil rights movement of the s in racially conflicted Mississippi.

There is no trickier subject for a writer from the South than that of affection between a black person and a white one in the unequal world of segregation. For the dishonesty upon which a society is founded makes every emotion suspect, makes it impossible to know whether what flowed between two people was honest feeling or pity or pragmatism.

I did not expect this book to hit so close to home. After all, I did not grow up in the South and completely missed the racial mind shift in the country.

And I did grow up in South America with a maid trying to keep herself out of poverty by making our crazy family happy. As much as we loved her, I can see so many of the pitfalls from these complex relationships in my own history. I know our maid was stuck between pleasing my mother and raising us the way she believed appropriate. She had absolutely no power, and yet she was all powerful to shape and mold us.

I needed her, felt bad for how much I imposed upon her, but I never voiced how much I appreciated or loved her. I took her for granted. Even though she was paid to love us, I know she did.

We were her children, especially my youngest brothers. And yet when she moved back home, we lost contact. Was it out of laziness of our own narcissistic lives or was the complexity of our relationship so draining she cut the tie? It is my fear that she thinks we did not return her affection and only thought of her as the maid. I often think about her, we all reminisce about her wondering where she is, and more than anything, I just want to know that she is happy and tell her thank you.

It is so strange that someone who is such a vital part of your childhood can just vanish out of your life. You only get one in a lifetime. Believe me, I know. The story is strong and real and touched something deep inside me. I could so relate to the motherly love from Constantine to Skeeter, see that pain in the triangle between Aibileen and Mae Mobley and Elizabeth, feel the exasperation of Minny toward Celia, and understand the complexity of the good and bad, the love and hate, the fear and security.

Stockett captured all these emotions. I also loved the writing style. When style compliments plot, I get giddy. The novel is about a white woman secretly compiling true accounts of black maids--and the novel is in essence a white author trying to understand black maids. The styles parallel each other as do the messages. The fictional novel cover is decorated with the white dove of love and understanding. To get us there, Stockett gives us three ordinary birds, a picture of ordinary life asking to be accepted for its honest simplicity.

From the first page, the voice of the characters took vivid form and became real, breathing people. My favorite scene was when Hilly says they have to be careful of racists because they are out there. She lived this book to some extent and the story is a part of her. View all 40 comments. Mar 15, Ellen rated it it was ok Shelves: The Kindle DX I ordered is galloping to the rescue today AND, for all the book purists which would include me , this is a need , rather than a want.

However, despite the visual challenges, I read all pages of The Help yesterday. Clearly, the book held my interest. What goes on in the homes of the upper crust? How do these women really treat their maids? Though the book would be published anonymously and no locations would be given, the stories provide enough detail so that the premise that the book could be received as being about Anywhere, USA defies belief.

For the maids, discovery would mean loss of a job with no hope of getting another position and retribution that could include being falsely accused of a crime and jailed or even being injured or killed. Despite the underlying tension and references to violent events that do occur, the book teeters.

At times, I was furious and in tears over the effing racism and the tragedies described. But Kathryn Stockett keeps pulling back. What these women endured deserves more. View all 53 comments. It more or less rubbed me the wrong way. It reads like the musings of a white woman attempting to have an uncomfortable conversation, without really wanting to be uncomfortable. The national fascination with this book makes me sick. It makes me think of my grandmother who was "the help" to many white families for well over 50 years.

In fact, I think she we would be horrified at the thought that her years of hard work in some cases, for some very horrible people would be reduced to some wannabe feel good story of the past.

View all 55 comments. Nov 27, Lola rated it really liked it Shelves: You gone have to ask yourself, "Am I gone believe what them fools say about me today?

B-but… The Help is different. We all want to live our lives the best way possible and be treated with respect. Miss Skeeter is also an important part of this story. She faces obstacles, so many of them, but does she ever back down? No, because when she believes in something, no one can kill her spirit. He is the most frustrating part of the story, really. We hate him, we love him, we like him and then we hate him for the rest of the book.

Never fear, the underlying themes of the story are extraordinary and that alone should make everyone want to read this book. I would also like to take advantage of this space offered to me and recommend the movie. Apr 08, karen rated it it was amazing Shelves: View all 84 comments. Apr 02, Kai rated it it was amazing Shelves: Not that much separates us.

This novel did so many things to me. There was lots of crying Find more of my books on Instagram. View all 14 comments. Jan 12, Majenta rated it it was amazing. Celia Foote needs a domestic engineer, but she also needs a friend, a real ally, even a confidante. Oh, one more thing: I think this plotline was my favorite part.

But, really, which is the worse attack from Minny: View all 12 comments. Jan 07, James rated it really liked it Shelves: I read this book at least 4 years ago, before I began to more consistently use Goodreads And I wonder how many people just watched the I read this book at least 4 years ago, before I began to more consistently use Goodreads And I wonder how many people just watched the movie I truly think it is a fantastic book, and it makes you really think about what happened in the not-so-distant past The characters are very clear and strong.

And when there are upwards of 10 to 12 supporting or lead female characters, an author has to spend a tremendous amount of time creating distinct pictures in a readers mind. Stockett did a great job with this task. Each and every one shows you a different personality: When a writer can shuffle this many people throughout a story, they have invested themselves into the book, the characters, the setting, the theme, the future. About Me For those new to me or my reviews I read A LOT.

I write A LOT. First the book review goes on Goodreads, and then I send it on over to my WordPress blog at https: Leave a comment and let me know what you think.

Vote in the poll and ratings. Thanks for stopping by. View all 30 comments. Dec 01, Nancy rated it it was amazing Shelves: Audio books are good for me. I was so engrossed in the story and characters that I drove the speed limit on the highway and took the scenic route while running errands. Sometimes I went out at lunch and needlessly drove in circles, or sat in the parking lot at work, waiting for a good place to stop.

It is in Jackson, Mississippi. She is still grieving for her young son, who died in a workplace accident. The story jumps back and forth between the three characters, all of them providing their version of life in the South, the dinner parties, the fund-raising events, the social and racial boundaries, family relationships, friendships, working relationships, poverty, hardship, violence, and fear.

I loved this story! The characters really came alive for me, and the author did a good job acknowledging actual historical events which lent richness and authenticity to the story. I laughed and cried, felt despair and hope.

This is an important story that is a painful reminder of past cruelty and injustice. It shows how far we have progressed and how much more we still have to accomplish. View all 54 comments. Mar 02, Jason rated it really liked it Shelves: View all 11 comments. Jul 10, Salome G rated it did not like it. This could have really used a better editor. We never see why she would want to be friends with either of them, Hilly especially. Other characters were equally unbelievable.

All the maids are good people and so gracious to Miss Skeeter, save one. Reading their interactio The story itself: Before reading, my question was, can Kathryn Stockett write this story? I read the whole book. I read the self-conscious afterword. Can Stockett write this story? Well, of course she can. I lean toward no.

This is not her story to tell. And neither did Kathryn Stockett. So she made up the story. And it was still all about the white lady. View all 46 comments. Before she began writing her book, she put up with his secret-keeping and general unsatisfactory treatment of her. By the end, however, she cast him aside because she realized how much better she deserved. I enjoyed parts of this story but for the most part, eh.

The ending really bothered me. White lady goes off and gets a great job while the black folks the story was about gets fired which was actually a blessing but a tragedy for the kids and leaves her husband to raise 6 kids alone. Minny needed to leave Leroy. Elizabeth is still an idiot. There was nothing redeeming in this story. Jun 18, Dana Ilie rated it it was amazing. There is a lot to like about this book. And I was impressed by the fairly even-handedness of the t There is a lot to like about this book.

And I was impressed by the fairly even-handedness of the topic that Stockett managed. There are good and bad and goodish-baddish people on every side of the issue, and each has different motivations and reasons for being where they are on that side — hate, pride, naivete, personal experiences.

Three reasons why I love The Help: Get it now Searching for streaming and purchasing options Common Sense is a nonprofit organization. Your purchase helps us remain independent and ad-free. Get it now on Searching for streaming and purchasing options X of Y Movie review 2: X of Y Official trailer.

A lot or a little? Coca-Cola is shown a couple of times, as is a Piggly Wiggly supermarket. Continue reading Show less. Stay up to date on new reviews. Get full reviews, ratings, and advice delivered weekly to your inbox. User Reviews Parents say Kids say. Parent of a 11 year old Written by reinzig August 11, Wonderful film, great message, good education Saw it the day it opened with our 11 year old daughter. Adult Written by cindyo August 14, Fabulous - go see! We took our 11 year old last night to see this movie.

Very kid appropriate and teaches them about race relations especially in the early Kid, 10 years old August 13, Really Touching Movie Overall, this was a really, really sweet movie! Of course, there was a lot of swearing, drinking, and smoking, but that was probably because the movie was set i Kid, 12 years old June 5, Educational Movie- I was impressed This was a great educational movie for kids and adults.

It is very true to what happened in real life and what maybe could be happening now, it really shows tha Is it any good? Talk to your kids about Movie details In theaters: August 12, On DVD or streaming: December 6, Cast: For kids who love drama and comedy.

Drama Movies That Tug at the Heartstrings. Best Classic Comedy Films.

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Gush, gush, gush, gush, gush! I cannot gush enough about this book. The Help, by Kathryn Stockett, follows the lives of three women living in Jackson, Mississippi. Two of the women, Aibilene and Minny are black, hired as help to wealthy, or trying to appear wealthy, white families/5.

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The book is narrated by three very different women; Minny, a black maid unable to keep a job due to her hot head, Aibileen, another black maid who is raising her 'seventeenth white child', and Miss Skeeter, at the opposite end of the .

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I originally read the audio book edition of "The Help" by Kathryn Stockett and later read it on my Kindle for book club. The Help is most definitely on my short list for all time favorite books. I am not sure which was better the audio book or the Kindle read. This is the first novel by this author and I do not know how she will ever top herself. Apr 01,  · By Kathryn Stockett Putnam. pp. $ Southern whites' guilt for not expressing gratitude to the black maids who raised .

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Summary and reviews of The Help by Kathryn Stockett, plus links to a book excerpt from The Help and author biography of Kathryn Stockett. Feb 19,  · In “The Help,” Kathryn Stockett’s button-pushing, soon to be wildly popular novel about black domestic servants working in white Southern households in the early s, one woman works especially tirelessly.