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❶Oxford is named after a ford where people used to take their oxen across the river Thames. Delta — A wide muddy or sandy area where some rivers meet the sea.

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The River Nile flooded every year between June and September, in a season the Egyptians called akhet - the inundation. Melting snow and heavy summer rain in the Ethiopian Mountains sent a torrent of water causing the banks of the River Nile in Egypt to overflow on the flat desert land.

Why does the Nile not flood now? Hapi was the Nile god. Honouring a god was very important, so when a flood came the Egyptians would thank Hapi for bringing fertility to the land. Nile River A fantastic resource about the Nile. Fact File of the River Nile. Follow me on Twitter mbarrow. I teach computers at The Granville School and St. This site uses cookies. See our Cookie Policy for information.

You may not redistribute, sell or place the content of this page on any other website or blog without written permission from the author Mandy Barrow. Ancient Egypt by Mandy Barrow. Quick facts about the River Nile Continent. Countries it flows through. Approx 6, kilometers 4, miles. Where do rivers begin? Rivers begin at their source in higher ground such as mountains or hills, where rain water or melting snow collects and forms tiny streams.

When one stream meets another and they merge together, the smaller stream is known as a tributary. It takes many tributary streams to form a river. The great majority of rivers eventually flow into a larger body of water, like an ocean, sea, or large lake.

The end of the river is called the mouth. Most settlements were built along major rivers. Rivers provide us with food, energy, recreation, transportation routes, and of course water for irrigation and for drinking.

Follow me on Twitter mbarrow. Today, instead of using a wheel to operate equipment, we build big dams across the rivers and use the force of the water to turn turbines and generate electricity to power our machines. We call this hydro-electricity because it is generated from water. Bank — The riverbank is the land at the side of the river. Basin — Rainwater that falls on hills flows down the side of the hills into rivers. A river basin the group of hills, valleys and lakes that water flows into the river from.

Bed — The bed is the bottom of a river. A riverbed can be made of sand, rocks or mud depending on the river. Canal — A man-made waterway that is used so that boats can transport goods across bits of the country where there are no rivers they can use. Current — The strength and speed of the river. Water always flows downhill; the steeper the ground is, the stronger the current will be. Delta — A wide muddy or sandy area where some rivers meet the sea.

The river slows down and drops all the sediments it was carrying. Downstream — The direction that the water flows, downhill towards the sea Fresh water — Rainwater that falls from the sky has no salt in it. We call this fresh water. Erosion — When a river flows fast it damages the riverbanks and washes bits of them downstream. This makes the river wider. Estuary — Where a river reaches the ocean and the river and ocean mix.

Estuaries are normally wide and flat. Floodplain — The flat area around a river that often gets flooded when the level of water in the river is high. Mouth — The end of a river where it flows into the sea, another river or a lake.

Silt — Small bits of dirt or sand that are carried along by a river. Source — The start of a river is its source. This could be a spring on a hillside, a lake, or a bog or marsh. A river may have more than one source.

Stream — A small river Tidal river — At the end of a river, near the ocean, water from the sea flows up the river when the tide comes in. Tributary — A smaller river or stream that joins a big river is called a tributary.

Upstream — The opposite direction to the way the water in a river flows Watershed — Water flows down the side of hills into rivers. But, water that lands on opposite sides of the same hill might flow into different rivers. The watershed is the boundary between two river basins. Access thousands of brilliant resources to help your child be the best they can be.

What is a river? Rivers carry rainwater from hills downhill to other rivers, lakes or the ocean. The start of a river is called the source and the end is called the mouth. Many rivers and streams will join together before they reach the mouth of the river.

The smaller rivers and streams are called tributaries. A fast flowing river will carry soil and dirt from its banks and bed downstream and drop them when it gets wider and slows down.

What is a river?

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As the river flows downstream, it gains more water from other streams, rivers, springs, added rainfall, and other water sources. What is a river? A river is freshwater flowing across the surface of the land, usually to the sea.

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The River Nile is about 6, km (4, miles) in length and is the longest river in Africa and in the world. Although it is generally associated with Egypt, only 22% of the Nile’s course runs through Egypt. Elementary School Middle School High School. Didn't find what you need? • Ask A Librarian.

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As the river flows downstream, it gains more water from other streams, rivers, springs, added rainfall, and other water sources. A river is freshwater flowing across the surface of the land, usually to the sea. Some rivers flow into the sea but other rivers flow into lakes or bigger rivers. The start of a river is called the source. The source of a river is the furthest point on the river from its mouth.